SQUIDWINGS

The Squidwing is a hybrid slow jig, casting and trolling lure that is lethal on large Snapper and kingfish.

FREESTYLE KABURA

Find out why the Catch Fishing Freestyle Kabura is an absolute MUST HAVE in your tackle box

MICROJIGS

Microjigging is a popular way to fish. Our range has been designed specifically for New Zealand waters.

Do you want to catch BIG fish?.

Thanks you're all joined, good luck!

Sorry Something went wrong, please try again

Subscribe to our monthly newsletter, and we will tell you where we are fishing, what we are catching, tips to help you catch more fish, and much more. You will also be in the monthly draw to win Catch lures and other great prizes. You can unsubscribe at anytime with one click.

The Catch Range.

We’re proud of our New Zealand designed quality Lures, Rods and fishing tools.
Hundreds of hours of testing and research goes into each product so that you can catch more fish!

4 days ago

Catch Fishing

John dory on the 100gm 'Shady Lady' squidwing for Jason Danial Grimmett using the new left-handed pe2000 and pe2 acid carbon wrap rod. ... See MoreSee Less

John dory on the 100gm Shady Lady squidwing for Jason Danial Grimmett using the new left-handed pe2000 and pe2 acid carbon wrap rod.

Comment on Facebook

Love the action on the rod and smooth drag and retrieval. Nice 100gram shady lady to match the urban cowgirl kayak

Nice ! I really love Outdoor activities

5 days ago

Catch Fishing

GT Fishing Report – 22 April 2017

The advent of circle hooks, also known as long-line hooks or recurved hooks, has changed the angling scene.
Circle hooks are exactly that, a hook shaped like an almost perfect circle with the point running perpendicular to the shank, rather than parallel to it like a convention J hook (commonly called suicide, beak or octopus models).
Despite being relatively new to the angling community, circles have been used by the commercial sector for years. The tuna long-line fishery created the need for a hook which could hook a fish unaided, but which the fish could not dislodge by struggling against the line. The Japanese fising industry came up with answer, but the style of hook goes back to ancient times and pre-European Polynesian fishermen used hooks fashioned from bone or stone of a similar shape.
While these hooks are now always employed by game fishermen trolling or setting live baits or whole dead baits for fish like broadbill swordfish, marlin and tuna they are also now common among the bottom-fishing fraternity; those who drop cut baits for snapper, tarakihi, gurnard, hapuku and other species found on the sea floor.
The pre-made flasher rigs and ledger rigs always involve recurves, as do long-lines although these are smaller and more box-shaped. But the principles are all the same; they are designed for the fish to hook itself, and this is where many anglers become unstuck. They have been using J hooks all their lives, and of course these require the angler to strike in order to set the hook. Circle hooks are completely the opposite, as they are designed to hook the fish without any help from the angler. But to suddenly say ‘Don’t do anything’ is hard for many to grasp, and they can’t resist the temptation to strike when they feel a bite. How often do you hear, ‘I put the rod in the holder to do something, and all of a sudden it bent over and there was a fish on.’
It helps to understand how the hook works. Imagine a fish has come along and eaten the bait, and as it moves away the water pressure will push the line against its body. This in turn ensures that the line is running out of the corner of the mouth. This applies whether it is a live bait being swallowed head first, or a chunk of pilchard being chewed. When the hook slides around in the corner of the mouth the point catches on the hinge of the jaw and digs in. This system works well on a set long-line as the trace slides along the backbone until it hits a stop and so sets the hook.
So the answer when holding a rod is to either let the fish take out some line, then slowly ease the drag up and start winding when it comes tight. Or, you can lower the rod towards the water which gives the fish a little time to swim away, before winding slowly and taking up the slack. Either way a violent jerk is not needed to set the hook.
A simple test which illustrates how these hooks work is to drop a circle hook into a bucket then slowly pull it out. The hook will catch on the lip of the bucket every time.
Alternatively if you pull the line quickly then the hook will simply bounce over the rim, which means a missed strike.
Basically, when a bite is detected the answer is to not strike, which pulls the bait away from the fish, but give it ample time to get the bait down.
There is another benefit from using these hooks and that is the conservation angle. Whether game fishing or snapper fishing, we are all conscious of the need to release many of the fish we catch. With conventional J hooks the fish is often gut-hooked because it has swallowed the bait, and the damage caused by removing the hook in these circumstances will guarantee that the fish is going to die. Circle hooks almost invariably hook the fish in the corner of the mouth, and it can be easily removed with long-nosed pliers. This minimises the damage and improves the chances of survival.
The other important factor when releasing fish is to not remove them from the water if possible. Lean over the side and flick the hook out. If the fish has to be lifted out of the water because of the size of the boat or you want a photo, use a net and when handling the fish do so with a wet towel, not dry hands which damage the layer of slime on the skin and increase the odds of infection.

Freshwater
Lake Rotoiti continues to provide great fishing, particularly for those anglers familiar with jigging. Some experts have caught hundreds of trout since Christmas, returning most to the water. They know how to find the depth where the smelt and trout are gathered, and hold the boat in position with an electric motor. When using colour-coded braid line you can hit the exact depth you want and then it is a question of jiggling the rod with small wrist movements until a fish strikes the smelt flies. The small silver, green and white smelt patterns are the most popular, but like most fishing it is more a question of where you put the lure rather than the pattern.

Bite times
Bite times are am 8.30am and 8.55pm today, and 9.20am and 9.45pm tomorrow.

Tip
If a fish has swallowed the hook and you still want to release it, cut the line as close as possible to the mouth and let it go. It is amazing just how fish hooked like this can survive, as the salt soon rusts the hook away. For game fishermen it is also important to use hooks made from galvanised iron and not stainless steel, for this very reason.
More fishing action can be found at www.GTTackle.co.nz.

Photo : Geoff Thomas
Circle hooks invariably hook fish like this snapper in the corner of the mouth.
... See MoreSee Less

GT Fishing Report – 22 April 2017

The advent of circle hooks, also known as long-line hooks or recurved hooks, has changed the angling scene. 
Circle hooks are exactly that, a hook shaped like an almost perfect circle with the point running perpendicular to the shank, rather than parallel to it like a convention J hook (commonly called suicide, beak or octopus models).
Despite being relatively new to the angling community, circles have been used by the commercial sector for years. The tuna long-line fishery created the need for a hook which could hook a fish unaided, but which the fish could not dislodge by struggling against the line. The Japanese fising industry came up with answer, but the style of hook goes back to ancient times and pre-European Polynesian fishermen used hooks fashioned from bone or stone of a similar shape.
While these hooks are now always employed by game fishermen trolling or setting live baits or whole dead baits for fish like broadbill swordfish, marlin and tuna they are also now common among the bottom-fishing fraternity; those who drop cut baits for snapper, tarakihi, gurnard, hapuku and other species found on the sea floor.
The pre-made flasher rigs and ledger rigs always involve recurves, as do long-lines although these are smaller and more box-shaped. But the principles are all the same; they are designed for the fish to hook itself, and this is where many anglers become unstuck. They have been using J hooks all their lives, and of course these require the angler to strike in order to set the hook. Circle hooks are completely the opposite, as they are designed to hook the fish without any help from the angler. But to suddenly say ‘Don’t do anything’ is hard for many to grasp, and they can’t resist the temptation to strike when they feel a bite. How often do you hear, ‘I put the rod in the holder to do something, and all of a sudden it bent over and there was a fish on.’
It helps to understand how the hook works. Imagine a fish has come along and eaten the bait, and as it moves away the water pressure will push the line against its body. This in turn ensures that the line is running out of the corner of the mouth. This applies whether it is a live bait being swallowed head first, or a chunk of pilchard being chewed. When the hook slides around in the corner of the mouth the point catches on the hinge of the jaw and digs in. This system works well on a set long-line as the trace slides along the backbone until it hits a stop and so sets the hook. 
So the answer when holding a rod is to either let the fish take out some line, then slowly ease the drag up and start winding when it comes tight. Or, you can lower the rod towards the water which gives the fish a little time to swim away, before winding slowly and taking up the slack. Either way a violent jerk is not needed to set the hook.
A simple test which illustrates how these hooks work is to drop a circle hook into a bucket then slowly pull it out. The hook will catch on the lip of the bucket every time.
Alternatively if you pull the line quickly then the hook will simply bounce over the rim, which means a missed strike.
Basically, when a bite is detected the answer is to not strike, which pulls the bait away from the fish, but give it ample time to get the bait down.
There is another benefit from using these hooks and that is the conservation angle. Whether game fishing or snapper fishing, we are all conscious of the need to release many of the fish we catch. With conventional J hooks the fish is often gut-hooked because it has swallowed the bait, and the damage caused by removing the hook in these circumstances will guarantee that the fish is going to die. Circle hooks almost invariably hook the fish in the corner of the mouth, and it can be easily removed with long-nosed pliers. This minimises the damage and improves the chances of survival.
The other important factor when releasing fish is to not remove them from the water if possible. Lean over the side and flick the hook out. If the fish has to be lifted out of the water because of the size of the boat or you want a photo, use a net and when handling the fish do so with a wet towel, not dry hands which damage the layer of slime on the skin and increase the odds of infection.

Freshwater  
Lake Rotoiti continues to provide great fishing, particularly for those anglers familiar with jigging. Some experts have caught hundreds of trout since Christmas, returning most to the water. They know how to find the depth where the smelt and trout are gathered, and hold the boat in position with an electric motor. When using colour-coded braid line you can hit the exact depth you want and then it is a question of jiggling the rod with small wrist movements until a fish strikes the smelt flies. The small silver, green and white smelt patterns are the most popular, but like most fishing it is more a question of where you put the lure rather than the pattern.

Bite times
Bite times are am 8.30am and 8.55pm today, and 9.20am and 9.45pm tomorrow.

Tip
If a fish has swallowed the hook and you still want to release it, cut the line as close as possible to the mouth and let it go. It is amazing just how fish hooked like this can survive, as the salt soon rusts the hook away. For game fishermen it is also important to use hooks made from galvanised iron and not stainless steel, for this very reason.
More fishing action can be found at www.GTTackle.co.nz.  

Photo : Geoff Thomas
Circle hooks invariably hook fish like this snapper in the corner of the mouth.

Comment on Facebook

A very very good read indeed!

Great read guys

5 days ago

Catch Fishing

Where's The Fish 21 April 2017. Baitfish, kahawai and screamin...
WTF - 21 April 2017

King kahawai, yes monstrous reel drag burning kahawai are on their welcome Autumn rampage, they are in feeding and breeding mode and on light tackle they are an absolute ball of fun!

Large schools of kahawai are moving around a lot. They are chasing down anchovy schools that are keen to avoid them naturally. Consequently kahawai can be in a confined area one day, and not the next. Either way they sure do provide fishing thrills, especially when other species may not be biting.

Baitschools are in good numbers in 35-40m, some solid walls of them with those big foot-long mackerel as well as blue mackerel. Both of these fish are also chasing anchovies by the looks of the sounder earlier this week. So ‘find the bait, find the fish’ rings true.

Snapper hunters may need to head out a bit further for the bigger versions, out north and east of Anchorite way. There has been a distinct afternoon bite, therefore a good plan is to drift the 40m area in amongst the general fish life on your way out picking steady pannie snapper here and there with a teasing temptation like a Kabura. Use the effective technique of ‘Rod Holder’ for a while, one wind up from the bottom. Watch as the pannie snapper tag the buoyant tails and hook themselves. Once the bite comes on strong, head out or change out to a much more aggressive jig like the Boss, Beta Bug or Squidwing – you’ll tend to catch the bigger snapper then.

Kingfish are hounding the kahawai schools, they’re there! Just wait for the dinner gong (bite time) and choose your weapon, jigs or livebaits, and hang on!

Cheers,
Espresso.

Extreme Boats Honda Marine New Zealand Isuzu Utes New Zealand Ltd Furuno New Zealand Savwinch Drum Winches

Grant Bittle Arnie Mears Jason Danial Grimmett Jason Kemp Re-loaded Naomi Peterson John Donald Rudee Lim Lee Kennedy Andy Hastings Jeff Strang Tawhana Terry David Shin Tim Fairhurst Karl Raymond Drent Cam Allan Carl Jackson Daniel Morris Mate Bitunjac Bryce Kerkhof Leah Phillips Jo Davis Rob Tongotea Jason Clendon Callum Millar Bam Blaikie Shane Kelly Derrick Paull Viking Kayaks Team Reef Raiders
... See MoreSee Less

Comment on Facebook

Get out there Ashley

Mick

Andy Little

1 week ago

Catch Fishing

Some mighty fine Northland snappers for Jason Kemp Re-loaded. The 100gm 'shady lady' squidwing and 20gm 'orange assassin' beta bug doing the damage. ... See MoreSee Less

Some mighty fine Northland snappers for Jason Kemp Re-loaded. The 100gm shady lady squidwing and 20gm orange assassin beta bug doing the damage.

Comment on Facebook

Yum

Big bugger

YES I like your page, thanks

2 weeks ago

Catch Fishing

WTF - 15 April 2017

Eerily calm seas for a few hours beckon us to go out fishing, especially this past week however the smooth sea state has been accompanied by gale wind warnings, cyclone arrival and on-shore floods, Mother Nature is in a typically changeable mood as Autumn gets well underway.

Flexibility is a must right now to get a good solid dose of fishing-fix, earlier this week the easterlies thumping in meant only a cursory glance at Swellmap was needed, or simply to poke your head out the door and have it slam shut with high wind gusts. Yet over on the west coast less than an hour drive – rather good conditions, and most importantly lots of fish! Mega up-sized kahawai and solid snapper underneath has been the name of the game just out over the Manukau bar, and with the amount of fish-life, big bait schools and water temperatures there are still marlin waiting patiently to be caught.

Autumn fishing has to be one of the best fishing times, the variety of possible fish species available, to the sheer intensity of bite from big fish makes for very happy times, we just need to keep an eye on the weather as forecasts are only that, a prediction so being ready to go a day earlier or later helps a great deal, after all no one ever said on their death bed, “I’m glad I didn’t spend more time fishing”! Carpe Diem – seize the day if you can, whether it’s inshore areas in the lee of land, or when that wind drops, head out fast and see what can be caught, with the sea stirred up there’s plenty of fish feed around so expect some good action fishing.

With the minimal water visibility it would pay to advertise your offerings, highly luminous lures, lots of vibration and motion to help attract fish close enough to see, bite and hook up!

Cheers,
Espresso.
... See MoreSee Less

WTF - 15 April 2017
 
Eerily calm seas for a few hours beckon us to go out fishing, especially this past week however the smooth sea state has been accompanied by gale wind warnings, cyclone arrival and on-shore floods, Mother Nature is in a typically changeable mood as Autumn gets well underway.
 
Flexibility is a must right now to get a good solid dose of fishing-fix, earlier this week the easterlies thumping in meant only a cursory glance at Swellmap was needed, or simply to poke your head out the door and have it slam shut with high wind gusts. Yet over on the west coast less than an hour drive – rather good conditions, and most importantly lots of fish! Mega up-sized kahawai and solid snapper underneath has been the name of the game just out over the Manukau bar, and with the amount of fish-life, big bait schools and water temperatures there are still marlin waiting patiently to be caught.
 
Autumn fishing has to be one of the best fishing times, the variety of possible fish species available, to the sheer intensity of bite from big fish makes for very happy times, we just need to keep an eye on the weather as forecasts are only that, a prediction so being ready to go a day earlier or later helps a great deal, after all no one ever said on their death bed, “I’m glad I didn’t spend more time fishing”! Carpe Diem – seize the day if you can, whether it’s inshore areas in the lee of land, or when that wind drops, head out fast and see what can be caught, with the sea stirred up there’s plenty of fish feed around so expect some good action fishing.
 
With the minimal water visibility it would pay to advertise your offerings, highly luminous lures, lots of vibration and motion to help attract fish close enough to see, bite and hook up!
 
Cheers,
 Espresso.

2 weeks ago

Catch Fishing

GT Fishing Report - 15 April 2017

The weather seems destined to influence fishing over the Easter weekend far more than usual for the last holiday before winter kicks in.
The timing of Easter is determined by the moon, and it usually falls on a full moon which delivers fine, settled weather.
But for some reason this year it is three days after the full moon, which appeared on Tuesday, and that usually signals the turnaround in fishing generally as fish become more active after the quiet few days on either side of the full moon.
But successive cyclonic storms over a short period have played havoc with rivers and streams, so fresh water fishing will be limited to lakes. And inshore waters all around the country will be inundated with dirty run-off as rivers wash muddy waters into the sea.
This is all going to make fishing challenging, for dirty water makes for hard fishing.
It does inject nutrients and debris and food into the sea, but that is not much use to the hopeful fisherman trying to get out this weekend.
There will be some sheltered waters, whether in a harbour or inside a peninsula, and apart from local weather this is a great time for fishing. Snapper are feeding hard to regain condition after the rigours of spawning, and all fish are building up fat reserves in preparation for the leaner winter pickings.
We are spoiled in this coutnry when it comes to fish and seafood, and what we regard as good for only bait is often some of the best eating fish to be found. Piper have the finest translucent flesh and while local people in the far north may know just how good they are on the table, most see them as bait. And they make top bait; for snapper or kingfish. But if you can’t get out in the boat because of the weather why not take the kids and run a bait net around a corner of the beach. A handful of bread crumbs mixed with sand will soon bring the quarry within range, and there is no better family fun than wading out into into the water, pulling the end of the net around in a semi-circle, then drawing it up onto the beach.
Another little fish that is even more common is the humble yellowtail. These little mackerel are usually caught by accident when dropping baits for snapper, but a tiny baited hook will soon have them coming over the side. And they also make good bait, but they are even better eating.
A good friend from Japan who regularly visited Auckland to fish for snapper would get really excited when the yellowtails turned up. He called them aji, and would rather take home a bucket of aji than snapper.
His wife would carefully slice off the fillets, remove the bones and the skin, and roll them into balls which she fried in a pan with soy sauce and oil. The resulting mouthfulls of delicate fish were to die for.
Smoked mackerel filles are starting to appear in our supermarkets, and these are aji which have been caught in commercial nets. They are larger specimens than our local inshore varieties, and a fillet makes a decent meal. But supermarket product is never as good as the home-caught variety, so next time the yellowtails turn up put some on ice for the kitchen. They can be turned into pan-fried fillets, or put in the smoker and the result served warm on crackers under a layer of mashed avocado, perhaps with a squeeze of lemon juice.
Like all smoked fish mackerel are just fine when mixed with a white parsley sauce and a can of corn.
There is nothing wrong with sprats either. Technically yellow-eyed mullet, they were a staple of pre-European New Zealanders when they shoaled in huge numbers at stream mouths to spawn. When cut into chunks and pan fried they are still eaten in remote parts of the country. You just have to know where the bones are when picking them apart with a fork.
A pleasant surprise is waiting.

Freshwater
The influx of rainwater will trigger the runs of trout up rivers and tributaries prior to spawning, and in the lakes they will be hanging around stream mouths and at release points like the Landing and Rangiuru Bay of Lake Tarawera. Fly fishing at these spots has picked up in the past week, and fishing at night maybe a good option. Smelt are in close along the edge of the weed beds and a killer pattern like a Kilwell No 1 fished slowly on a sinking line works well. In spring flies with a yellow body are preferred but at this time of year a red body produces better results, maybe because the trout are starting to move into spawning mode and orange or red colours spark their interest.
Trout of 3.5-4kg have come from Okataina and Lake Rotoiti in the past two weeks, and as expected the fish are in prime condition. Harling or booby fishing will be best at dawn and dusk, then fishing the depths with lead-core or wire lines, or jigging, will offer the best chances during the day.

Bite times
Bite times are am 2.50am and 3.15pm today, and 3.40am and 4pm tomorrow.

Tip
Yellowtails are easily caught on sabiki jig flies dropped where sign shows up on the fish finder. It is always in midwater, and the right amount of line will find the depth. A scrap of bait added to the hook helps, and some people like to snip off every second hook to avoid tangles. More fishing action can be found at www.GTTackle.co.nz.

Photo : Geoff Thomas.
Yellowtails make fine eating, along with other small fish like piper and sprats.
... See MoreSee Less

GT Fishing Report - 15 April 2017

The weather seems destined to influence fishing over the Easter weekend far more than usual for the last holiday before winter kicks in.
The timing of Easter is determined by the moon, and it usually falls on a full moon which delivers fine, settled weather.
But for some reason this year it is three days after the full moon, which appeared on Tuesday, and that usually signals the turnaround in fishing generally as fish become more active after the quiet few days on either side of the full moon.
But successive cyclonic storms over a short period have played havoc with rivers and streams, so fresh water fishing will be limited to lakes. And inshore waters all around the country will be inundated with dirty run-off as rivers wash muddy waters into the sea.
This is all going to make fishing challenging, for dirty water makes for hard fishing.
It does inject nutrients and debris and food into the sea, but that is not much use to the hopeful fisherman trying to get out this weekend.
There will be some sheltered waters, whether in a harbour or inside a peninsula, and apart from local weather this is a great time for fishing. Snapper are feeding hard to regain condition after the rigours of spawning, and all fish are building up fat reserves in preparation for the leaner winter pickings.
We are spoiled in this coutnry when it comes to fish and seafood, and what we regard as good for only bait is often some of the best eating fish to be found. Piper have the finest translucent flesh and while local people in the far north may know just how good they are on the table, most see them as bait. And they make top bait; for snapper or kingfish. But if you can’t get out in the boat because of the weather why not take the kids and run a bait net around a corner of the beach. A handful of bread crumbs mixed with sand will soon bring the quarry within range, and there is no better family fun than wading out into into the water, pulling the end of the net around in a semi-circle, then drawing it up onto the beach.
Another little fish that is even more common is the humble yellowtail. These little mackerel are usually caught by accident when dropping baits for snapper, but a tiny baited hook will soon have them coming over the side. And they also make good bait, but they are even better eating.
A good friend from Japan who regularly visited Auckland to fish for snapper would get really excited when the yellowtails turned up. He called them aji, and would rather take home a bucket of aji than snapper.
His wife would carefully slice off the fillets, remove the bones and the skin, and roll them into balls which she fried in a pan with soy sauce and oil. The resulting mouthfulls of delicate fish were to die for.
Smoked mackerel filles are starting to appear in our supermarkets, and these are aji which have been caught in commercial nets. They are larger specimens than our local inshore varieties, and a fillet makes a decent meal. But supermarket product is never as good as the home-caught variety, so next time the yellowtails turn up put some on ice for the kitchen. They can be turned into pan-fried fillets, or put in the smoker and the result served warm on crackers under a layer of mashed avocado, perhaps with a squeeze of lemon juice.
Like all smoked fish mackerel are just fine when mixed with a white parsley sauce and a can of corn.
There is nothing wrong with sprats either. Technically yellow-eyed mullet, they were a staple of pre-European New Zealanders  when they shoaled in huge numbers at stream mouths to spawn. When cut into chunks and pan fried they are still eaten in remote parts of the country. You just have to know where the bones are when picking them apart with a fork.
A pleasant surprise is waiting.

Freshwater  
The influx of rainwater will trigger the runs of trout up rivers and tributaries prior to spawning, and in the lakes they will be hanging around stream mouths and at release points like the Landing and Rangiuru Bay of Lake Tarawera. Fly fishing at these spots has picked up in the past week, and fishing at night maybe a good option. Smelt are in close along the edge of the weed beds and a killer pattern like a Kilwell No 1 fished slowly on a sinking line works well. In spring flies with a yellow body are preferred but at this time of year a red body produces better results, maybe because the trout are starting to move into spawning mode and orange or red colours spark their interest.
Trout of 3.5-4kg have come from Okataina and Lake Rotoiti in the past two weeks, and as expected the fish are in prime condition. Harling or booby fishing will be best at dawn and dusk, then fishing the depths with lead-core or wire lines, or jigging, will offer the best chances during the day.

Bite times
Bite times are am 2.50am and 3.15pm today, and 3.40am and 4pm tomorrow.

Tip
Yellowtails are easily caught on sabiki jig flies dropped where sign shows up on the fish finder. It is always in midwater, and the right amount of line will find the depth. A scrap of bait added to the hook helps, and some people like to snip off every second hook to avoid tangles. More fishing action can be found at www.GTTackle.co.nz.  
 
Photo : Geoff Thomas.
Yellowtails make fine eating, along with other small fish like piper and sprats.

Comment on Facebook

Yellow tail is really good we had it for dinner the last week. We get a lot of yellow eye in whitianga waterways yet to eat them. Next on the list. But they make grate bait

The best bait.

Good live bait for big one.

2 weeks ago

Catch Fishing

NZ Fishing World reviews the Catch Top Water Xtreme rod
Win a Catch Top Water Xtreme Rod...Like Catch Facebook page and share to enter.
The new Top Water Xtreme 2-piece rod reviewed by NZ Fishing World. This is the rod Jason Grimmett took to Fiji for a work-out on yellowfin tuna and GTs! Featuring top quality Fuji components and constructed from Korean SK carbon, with an RRP of $299, this the Top Water Xtreme offers high performance and serious value for money. Available in all good tackle stores.
• Powerful high carbon blank for superior casting and
hook setting
• Heavy duty Fuji reel seat
• Premium quality Fuji guides for optimal casting and
tangle free performance
• Ergonomic contoured butt section
LURE WEIGHT: 60-130gram
LINE WEIGHT: PE4-6
LENGTH: 7’6” (228cm)
Catch ProSeries rods are designed and tested in New Zealand. They are built to withstand
the toughest fishing conditions.
Grant Bittle Arnie Mears Jason Kemp Re-loaded Jason Kemp Re-loaded Naomi Peterson Rudee Lim Lee Kennedy Andy Hastings Tawhana Terry David Shin Tim Fairhurst Karl Raymond Drent Carl Jackson Daniel Morris Mate Bitunjac Bryce Kerkhof Jo Davis Rob Tongotea Leah Phillips Jason Clendon Callum Millar Bam Blaikie Shane Kelly Smart Marine Hunting & Fishing New Zealand Swage Edward Lee
... See MoreSee Less

Comment on Facebook

John Donald Arnie Mears Naomi Peterson

Would so love to win this beauty rod, perfect for when we take our new boat up to Fiji to shallops some YFin's and GT's! Thanks for opportunity to enter!!

Would love to win this for my partner. I'm pretty sure he would be stoked as if I gave him this prize 😁

This would be awesome I need a rod!!!my mate keeps asking me to go out on his boat for a fish with him but I dont have a rod he has other rods I can use but it would be good to have my own :-)

Shared! If I won this my partner would be so stocked! Dinner would be served 👌

Would love this for myself but will let hubby use it if we won

Would love this as I hav"nt got a decent rod but this would be perfect shared

Always after a good rod as the Taranaki coast is tough

I'll love to win ...never won anything b4 ... and fishing is my hobby ...

This would be awsome to win, could serve up dinner to the family fkr a little ng time!!!

Thank you ,we have two family members who would love to win this.😘

I would love to be put in the draw for this please. My partner Davidson Wakelin and his dad love to get out on the boat for a fish every chance they get. He would love this!! Thank you for the chance 😊

I would love this for myself, it would be much better than using the TLD25 on shimano stinger rod I'm currently using, use this for everything.

I love ❤️ practically any seafood but it's my partner who's the fisherman he loves it I'm probably chief cook 👨‍🍳 and I don't do sea fishing me rocking water 💦 don't mix - BUT if I won I'd take every anti-sea sick 😷 pill known to mankind just to go out on a fishing 🎣. Trip like this with him....SO PLEASE PUT US THE DRAW -

Yes please this would be a dream come true I have just started fishing again from 20 years of not doing much when I was younger Stacey Alice Reeves ●▬▬▬▬▬ஜ۩۞۩ஜ▬▬▬▬▬▬▬●

Liked and shared for a chance to win my partner a new rod <3

It's in the bag... should be ok to use off the rocks or surf casting... multi purpose... ae... guys?

Sorry .. people.... this one has my name on it.... hahahar... try again next year..

Awesomeness what I need for the kingis up tolaga bay

this is rod I need Rudee Lim when I seen yours I fell in love it's not just a rod it's a design of rods and gear they make perfect design of art awesome

liked and shared. :) Would love to win for my Father :D :)

ohhh looking for a rod to fish white island to ...and because i dont have one yet ha ha :)

I Would love to get this fishing gear for Linda Gascoigne to come fishing

This would be awesome to win

Love to win this fantastic rod!

+ View previous comments