SQUIDWINGS

The Squidwing is a hybrid slow jig, casting and trolling lure that is lethal on large Snapper and kingfish.

FREESTYLE KABURA

Find out why the Catch Fishing Freestyle Kabura is an absolute MUST HAVE in your tackle box

MICROJIGS

Microjigging is a popular way to fish. Our range has been designed specifically for New Zealand waters.

Do you want to catch BIG fish?.

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The Catch Range.

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3 hours ago

Catch Fishing

From the sea to the dish!
Rudee Lim and Mateen Lim Lim recently paddled at least 10kms out to the 50m mark for a few tasty bluecod.
Soy and fresh ginger steamed bluecod with brown rice for dinner!
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From the sea to the dish!
Rudee and Mateen Lim recently paddled at least 10kms out to the 50m mark for a few tasty bluecod. 
Soy and fresh ginger steamed bluecod with brown rice for dinner!

24 hours ago

Catch Fishing

Here is an awesome prize to be in to win if you are planning to compete in the Northland Kayak Fishing Classic.GET YOUR EARLYBIRD TICKETS NOW!!! Purchase your tickets before 30th September 5pm and you will be in the draw to win this awesome rod and reel package including a full micro jig set curtesy of our friends over at Catch Fishing!! This set is valued at over $700! Jump online and grab your tickets now www.vikingkayaks.co.nz/shop/kayaks/kayak+fishing+competition+nov+2017+3333
Winner will be drawn at random at the official prize giving on the 12th of November. Best of luck 😊
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Here is an awesome prize to be in to win if you are planning to compete in the Northland Kayak Fishing Classic.

Comment on Facebook

Michael Ward, Dale Elmira, Philip Kenny what y'all think?

Win a Great Barrier Fishing Adventure on Wave Dancer Charters. Two days and one night of pure awesome for you and a mate at one of New Zealand's most celebrated "big fish" fishing destinations could be yours.

Catch Fishing/ Wave Dancer Uhai Edward Lee Extreme Boats Honda Marine New Zealand Furuno New Zealand Isuzu Utes New Zealand Ltd
Grant Bittle Samantha Gay Arnie Mears Naomi Peterson Jason Kemp Re-loaded Lee Kennedy Jason Danial Grimmett Rudee Lim Shannon Andy Hastings Jason Clendon Callum Millarl Tim Fairhurst Daniel Morris Carl Jackson Tawhana Terry Mohammed Ali David Shin Karl Raymond DrentMate Bitunjac Bryce Kerkhof Leah Phillips Jo Davis Derrick Paull Mark Blaikie Shane Kelly Viking Maniyaks Team Reef Raiders 2keenfishos She's Hooked NZ Fishing Y cozican Smart Marine Rob Tongotea AI Tanaka

Catch Fishing
Win a Great Barrier Fishing Adventure on Wave Dancer Charters. Two days and one night of pure awesome for you and a mate at one of New Zealand's most celebrated "big fish" fishing destinations could be yours.
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Hayley Horncy

Troy

2 days ago

Catch Fishing

GT Fishing Report - 19 August 2017.

The whitebait season opened on Wednesday and the first hopeful whitebaiters were no doubt down on the river bank checking for signs of the little fish at river mouths all around the country.
Once a resource that was so plentiful that surplus whitebait were fed to chickens or dug into the vegetable garden as fertiliser, whitebait has become a rare delicacy, a luxury for those who have to buy it. In Auckland supermarkets you can pay $25 for 100 grams, equating to $250 a kilo. And that is only enough for a couple of miserable fritters that will be more flour and egg than fish. A true whitebait fritter, according to the aficionados, will have just enough separated egg white to bind the tiny fish. Add a dash of salt and pepper and a squeeze of lemon juice and you have a dish fit for royalty. And whitebait is usually on the menu when royalty does make the journey from London.
The term whitebait is a generic one, applied to myriad tiny fish all over the world. An imported variety is available in the frozen food sections, but the white ‘Chinese whitebait’ are tasteless when compared to the real thing. Buyer beware.
In this country the term covers the juveniles of several different species of the galaxiid family, named after the Milky Way for the scattering of white spots along their flanks. Also known as kokopu there is the banded kokopu (the most common), koaro, the very rare short-jawed kokopu, giant kokopu and dwarf kokopu. The inanga, which is common in rivers like the Waikato, is also included in the whitebait family.
It is the conversion of native bush to grassland and the deterioration in water quality that has contributed to the demise of the different families, along with the destruction of reeds and grasses by grazing stock along river banks where the adult fish lay their eggs. Their reproduction is a fascinating story, where the adults live secretive lives hiding under banks in dark pools deep in the bush. In autumn these fish, which may be only 10cm long, journey down to the estuarine waters of their natal rivers and streams, to deposit bunches of eggs covered in a protective sticky membrane on overhanging grasses inundated by the highest tide of the month. They remain high and dry until washed by the next high tide when they hatch and the helpless hatchlings are swept out to sea where they grow quickly in the nutrient-rich salt water. Predators exact a heavy toll, and the survivors return in spring to the fresh water to migrate up the rivers to repeat the process. It is these returning juveniles which whitebaiters search for so eagerly, and they are joining sea-run trout, kahawai and birds which feast on the long, thin fish which are poor swimmers. Theories abound as to the best fishing times, but an incoming tide is acknowledged as the trigger when the fish use the surging current to combat the river currents. Moon phases and weather all come into the equation as discussion rages around a jug in the local pub. But when everything comes together, and the net is raised bulging with the ‘white gold’ the smiles are unstoppable. Stories of catches of a hundred kilos become instant legends.
The best known catch in recent times was when All Black coach Graham Henry was trying to track down Stephen Donald as the fifth-choice first-five for the World Cup final in 2011. “I couldn’t find him,” said Henry. “Then Jerome Kaino said ‘I know how to track him down’ and he called Richard Kahui, who was Beaver’s (Donald) best mate and told him to get Beaver to give me a call. When he rang I said,’what are you doing?’ He said he was whitebaiting. I told him : ‘Bring some whitebait and you can play in the World Cup final.’
“He brought eight kilos of whitebait and fed the whole team,” he said.

Salt water
The winter fishing this year has been great – when you can get out. The weather has made it hard as the better fishing is well offshore in most areas and the wind rarely allows boats to get out wide. In the Hauraki Gulf there are plenty of work-ups and concentrations of fish in the middle of the gulf, but it is exposed to windy conditions. If the season follows the usual pattern snapper will start congregating in schools prior to spawning, with males gathering in groups. They can be identified by the rusty, dark red marking under the throat which develops before spawning. The actual spawning starts when water temperatures reach18°C and can continue from November through to February as snapper are serial spawners. This is the time of year when winter anglers target gurnard in west coast harbours but, again, the weather determines when fishing is feasible. One trick is to use a red flasher rig with small hooks and put a sinker above the swivel attaching the trace to the line so that when the rig is dropped it lies along the seabed. A small sinker at the bottom end ensures all the hooks are close to the bottom.

Bite times
Bite times are 9.45am and 10.15pm today and 10.45am and 11.15pm tomorrow.

Tip of the week
Whitebait fishing is administered by DoC because they are native fish and unlike other fishing there is no limit to the catch and the delicacies can be sold without a licence. But there are rules, and the season runs through to November 30 and fishing is permitted from 5am to 8pm, and when daylight saving starts from 6am to 9pm. There is a different season for the west coast of the South Island – opening on September 1 and closing on November 14. Nets may not cover more than a third of a stream or river, to allow room for fish to swim upstream safely, and the size of nets is also limited. More fishing action can be found at www.GTTackle.co.nz.

Photo: Geoff Thomas
Simple fritters are hard to beat.
... See MoreSee Less

Comment on Facebook

Why are you promoting fishing for a species that is endangered?

Mmmm mmm

2 days ago

Catch Fishing

GT Fishing Report - 19 August 2017.

The whitebait season opened on Wednesday and the first hopeful whitebaiters were no doubt down on the river bank checking for signs of the little fish at river mouths all around the country.
Once a resource that was so plentiful that surplus whitebait were fed to chickens or dug into the vegetable garden as fertiliser, whitebait has become a rare delicacy, a luxury for those who have to buy it. In Auckland supermarkets you can pay $25 for 100 grams, equating to $250 a kilo. And that is only enough for a couple of miserable fritters that will be more flour and egg than fish. A true whitebait fritter, according to the aficionados, will have just enough separated egg white to bind the tiny fish. Add a dash of salt and pepper and a squeeze of lemon juice and you have a dish fit for royalty. And whitebait is usually on the menu when royalty does make the journey from London.
The term whitebait is a generic one, applied to myriad tiny fish all over the world. An imported variety is available in the frozen food sections, but the white ‘Chinese whitebait’ are tasteless when compared to the real thing. Buyer beware.
In this country the term covers the juveniles of several different species of the galaxiid family, named after the Milky Way for the scattering of white spots along their flanks. Also known as kokopu there is the banded kokopu (the most common), koaro, the very rare short-jawed kokopu, giant kokopu and dwarf kokopu. The inanga, which is common in rivers like the Waikato, is also included in the whitebait family.
It is the conversion of native bush to grassland and the deterioration in water quality that has contributed to the demise of the different families, along with the destruction of reeds and grasses by grazing stock along river banks where the adult fish lay their eggs. Their reproduction is a fascinating story, where the adults live secretive lives hiding under banks in dark pools deep in the bush. In autumn these fish, which may be only 10cm long, journey down to the estuarine waters of their natal rivers and streams, to deposit bunches of eggs covered in a protective sticky membrane on overhanging grasses inundated by the highest tide of the month. They remain high and dry until washed by the next high tide when they hatch and the helpless hatchlings are swept out to sea where they grow quickly in the nutrient-rich salt water. Predators exact a heavy toll, and the survivors return in spring to the fresh water to migrate up the rivers to repeat the process. It is these returning juveniles which whitebaiters search for so eagerly, and they are joining sea-run trout, kahawai and birds which feast on the long, thin fish which are poor swimmers. Theories abound as to the best fishing times, but an incoming tide is acknowledged as the trigger when the fish use the surging current to combat the river currents. Moon phases and weather all come into the equation as discussion rages around a jug in the local pub. But when everything comes together, and the net is raised bulging with the ‘white gold’ the smiles are unstoppable. Stories of catches of a hundred kilos become instant legends.
The best known catch in recent times was when All Black coach Graham Henry was trying to track down Stephen Donald as the fifth-choice first-five for the World Cup final in 2011. “I couldn’t find him,” said Henry. “Then Jerome Kaino said ‘I know how to track him down’ and he called Richard Kahui, who was Beaver’s (Donald) best mate and told him to get Beaver to give me a call. When he rang I said,’what are you doing?’ He said he was whitebaiting. I told him : ‘Bring some whitebait and you can play in the World Cup final.’
“He brought eight kilos of whitebait and fed the whole team,” he said.

Salt water
The winter fishing this year has been great – when you can get out. The weather has made it hard as the better fishing is well offshore in most areas and the wind rarely allows boats to get out wide. In the Hauraki Gulf there are plenty of work-ups and concentrations of fish in the middle of the gulf, but it is exposed to windy conditions. If the season follows the usual pattern snapper will start congregating in schools prior to spawning, with males gathering in groups. They can be identified by the rusty, dark red marking under the throat which develops before spawning. The actual spawning starts when water temperatures reach18°C and can continue from November through to February as snapper are serial spawners. This is the time of year when winter anglers target gurnard in west coast harbours but, again, the weather determines when fishing is feasible. One trick is to use a red flasher rig with small hooks and put a sinker above the swivel attaching the trace to the line so that when the rig is dropped it lies along the seabed. A small sinker at the bottom end ensures all the hooks are close to the bottom.

Bite times
Bite times are 9.45am and 10.15pm today and 10.45am and 11.15pm tomorrow.

Tip of the week
Whitebait fishing is administered by DoC because they are native fish and unlike other fishing there is no limit to the catch and the delicacies can be sold without a licence. But there are rules, and the season runs through to November 30 and fishing is permitted from 5am to 8pm, and when daylight saving starts from 6am to 9pm. There is a different season for the west coast of the South Island – opening on September 1 and closing on November 14. Nets may not cover more than a third of a stream or river, to allow room for fish to swim upstream safely, and the size of nets is also limited. More fishing action can be found at www.GTTackle.co.nz.

Photo: Geoff Thomas
Simple fritters are hard to beat.
... See MoreSee Less

GT Fishing Report - 19 August 2017.

The whitebait season opened on Wednesday and the first hopeful whitebaiters were no doubt down on the river bank checking for signs of the little fish at river mouths all around the country.
Once a resource that was so plentiful that surplus whitebait were fed to chickens or dug into the vegetable garden as fertiliser, whitebait has become a rare delicacy, a luxury for those who have to buy it. In Auckland supermarkets you can pay $25 for 100 grams, equating to $250 a kilo. And that is only enough for a couple of miserable fritters that will be more flour and egg than fish. A true whitebait fritter, according to the aficionados, will have just enough separated egg white to bind the tiny fish. Add a dash of salt and pepper and a squeeze of lemon juice and you have a dish fit for royalty. And whitebait is usually on the menu when royalty does make the journey from London.
The term whitebait is a generic one, applied to myriad tiny fish all over the world. An imported variety is available in the frozen food sections, but the white ‘Chinese whitebait’ are tasteless when compared to the real thing. Buyer beware.
In this country the term covers the juveniles of several different species of the galaxiid family, named after the Milky Way for the scattering of white spots along their flanks. Also known as kokopu there is the banded kokopu (the most common), koaro, the very rare short-jawed kokopu, giant kokopu and dwarf kokopu. The inanga, which is common in rivers like the Waikato, is also included in the whitebait family.
It is the conversion of native bush to grassland and the deterioration in water quality that has contributed to the demise of the different families, along with the destruction of reeds and grasses by grazing stock  along river banks where the adult fish lay their eggs.  Their reproduction is a fascinating story, where the adults live secretive lives hiding under banks in dark pools deep in the bush. In autumn these fish, which may be only 10cm long, journey down to the estuarine waters of their natal rivers and streams, to deposit bunches of eggs covered in a protective sticky membrane on overhanging grasses inundated by the highest tide of the month. They remain high and dry until washed by the next high tide when they hatch and the helpless hatchlings are swept out to sea where they grow quickly in the nutrient-rich salt water. Predators exact a heavy toll, and the survivors return in spring to the fresh water to migrate up the rivers to repeat the process. It is these returning juveniles which whitebaiters search for so eagerly, and they are joining sea-run trout, kahawai and birds which feast on the long, thin fish which are poor swimmers. Theories abound as to the best fishing times, but an incoming tide is acknowledged as the trigger when the fish use the surging current to combat the river currents. Moon phases and weather all come into the equation as discussion rages around a jug in the local pub. But when everything comes together, and the net is raised bulging with the ‘white gold’ the smiles are unstoppable. Stories of catches of a hundred kilos become instant legends. 
The best known catch in recent times was when All Black coach Graham Henry was trying to track down Stephen Donald as the fifth-choice first-five for the World Cup final in 2011. “I couldn’t find him,” said Henry. “Then Jerome Kaino said ‘I know how to track him down’ and he called Richard Kahui, who was Beaver’s (Donald) best mate and told him to get Beaver to give me a  call. When he rang I said,’what are you doing?’ He said he was whitebaiting. I told him : ‘Bring some whitebait and you can play in the World Cup final.’
“He brought eight kilos of whitebait and fed the whole team,” he said.

Salt water
The winter fishing this year has been great – when you can get out. The weather has made it hard as the better fishing is well offshore in most areas and the wind rarely allows boats to get out wide. In the Hauraki Gulf there are plenty of work-ups and concentrations of fish in the middle of the gulf, but it is exposed to windy conditions. If the season follows the usual pattern snapper will start congregating in schools prior to spawning, with males gathering in groups. They can be identified by the rusty, dark red marking under the throat which develops before spawning. The actual spawning starts when water temperatures reach18°C and can continue from November through to February as snapper are serial spawners. This is the time of year when winter anglers target gurnard in west coast harbours but, again, the weather determines when fishing is feasible. One trick is to use a red flasher rig with small hooks and put a sinker above the swivel attaching the trace to the line so that when the rig is dropped it lies along the seabed. A small sinker at the bottom end ensures all the hooks are close to the bottom.

Bite times
Bite times are 9.45am and 10.15pm today and 10.45am and 11.15pm tomorrow. 

Tip of the week
Whitebait fishing is administered by DoC because they are native fish and unlike other fishing there is no limit to the catch and the delicacies can be sold without a licence. But there are rules, and the season runs through to November 30 and fishing is permitted from 5am to 8pm, and when daylight saving starts from 6am to 9pm. There is a different season for the west coast of the South Island – opening on September 1 and closing on November 14. Nets may not cover more than a third of a stream or river, to allow room for fish to swim upstream safely, and the size of nets is also limited. More fishing action can be found at www.GTTackle.co.nz.  

Photo: Geoff Thomas
Simple fritters are hard to beat.

Comment on Facebook

Maybe even introduce a season on next season off deal. And from what I've been told by duck hunters the numbers dropped big time this year so could revolve between the two .duck hunt one year whitebait the next.

Time for A two year period of no whitebaiting at the least. AND WHY CAN THEY SELL IT? you can't sell any other sea food

A nice dish for Ben/Elle to eat?

Always learning something! Thanks 🙂

Hi anymore?

Yummy

Richard Tilyard We should be getting some

Jun Park Ben Gotdiz Tupaea we need this!!!

Its time to reassess the free for all aproach to whitebaiting. There is lots of talk about conserving resources and sustainability when it comes to snapper and other ocean species, and bagging of commercial fishing, but the same people are happy to go out and pillage what is probably the most at risk fishery in NZ. On the plus side though it is now possible to buy sustainable farmed NZ Whitebait.

Scottie Freegard

Aww how cruel.

wait for next year

Jack Castle

+ View previous comments

3 days ago

Catch Fishing

Join Catch Fishing's WTF author and Wave Dancer skipper Grant Bittle 'Espresso' Bittle this week on RadioLIVE's Fishing Show to find out where the fish are and how to catch them.
Find your frequency here: www.radiolive.co.nz/home/frequencies.html Or text 3920 with the keyword NORTH (for North Island) or keyword SOUTH (for South Island).
Or listen on the ROVA or RadioLIVE app.
... See MoreSee Less

Join Catch Fishings WTF author and  Wave Dancer skipper Grant Espresso Bittle this week on RadioLIVEs Fishing Show to find out where the fish are and how to catch them.
Find your frequency here: http://www.radiolive.co.nz/home/frequencies.html Or text 3920 with the keyword NORTH (for North Island) or keyword SOUTH (for South Island).
Or listen on the ROVA or RadioLIVE app.

3 days ago

Catch Fishing

WTF 17 August 2017 Kingfish and why lures work so well.
WTF - 17 August 2017

Ssshh don’t tell the fish, but they’re not supposed to be biting as well as this!

Winter it is, yet snapper are being caught in the middle of the day from local bays. Similarly kingfish are creating major havoc on light gear and monster kahawai are busting up the surface hassling baitfish. Excellent news.

Although a tad choppy out there this week with the forecast winds, the fishing has once again been very good. Well worth the extra effort, and leeward has often been calm and sunny. If you haven’t already, it’s time to dust that early pollen off the boat and get out in amongst the fishing action.

Inshore fishing around the high tide has proven rewarding. Not huge quantities but excellent pannie snapper, some solid kahawai and sizeable gurnard as well. Further afield the eastern middle ground has held fast fleeting workups, with snapper in dutiful presence underneath, again not vast in numbers but good eating size and in great condition too. Drifting the area well after even a small workup is turning up great variety, snapper, kahawai, gurnard, John Dory and kingfish too. Not crazy action but good steady stuff. The eastern side of the gulf has seen good action, whether out in 42m or right back into the coastline of Colville, huge schools of kingfish covering wide areas has been captivating, and even the smaller models produce such huge smiles with their blistering runs and never say die attitude on light gear, such a thrill.

Time to make the most of it, be prepared and just do it as they say!

Cheers
Espresso.

Catch Fishing / Wave Dancer / Extreme Boats / Honda Marine New Zealand / Furuno New Zealand / Savwinch Drum Winches / Isuzu Utes New Zealand Ltd

Grant Bittle John Donald Arnie Mears Naomi Peterson Jeff Strang Cam Allan Jason Kemp Re-loaded Lee Kennedy Jason Danial Grimmett Carl Jackson Rudee Lim Shannon Neho Mark Blaikie Andy Hastings Jason Clendon Callum Millar Tim Fairhurst Daniel Morris Rob Tongotea Tawhana Terry David Shin Karl Raymond Drent Mate Bitunjac Bryce Kerkhof Leah Phillips Jo Davis Derrick Paull Shane Kelly Viking Maniyaks Team Reef Raiders 2keenfishos She's Hooked NZ Reel addiction fishing Fishing Y cozican
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Comment on Facebook

they sure are biting

Justin Tombleson 25seconds in you will love it.

Ryan Burdett

John Rossiter