SQUIDWINGS

The Squidwing is a hybrid slow jig, casting and trolling lure that is lethal on large Snapper and kingfish.

FREESTYLE KABURA

Find out why the Catch Fishing Freestyle Kabura is an absolute MUST HAVE in your tackle box

MICROJIGS

Microjigging is a popular way to fish. Our range has been designed specifically for New Zealand waters.

Do you want to catch BIG fish?.

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The Catch Range.

We’re proud of our New Zealand designed quality Lures, Rods and fishing tools.
Hundreds of hours of testing and research goes into each product so that you can catch more fish!

2 days ago

Catch Fishing

Justin Tunnage getting into the Wellington Blue cod on the L'll Squidwings. ... See MoreSee Less

Justin Tunnage getting into the Wellington Blue cod on the Lll Squidwings.

4 days ago

Catch Fishing

GT Fishing Report - 24 June 2017

Some huge snapper are being caught by casting soft baits into two metres of water around the rocky shoreline of Great Barrier Island. While this type of fishing is quite specialised, it can be adapted to any situation where current and white water are present. It is particularly effective around offshore islands like the Barrier, the Moko Hinau and the Mercury Islands.
But it will also work anywhere a point or peninsular protrudes from the shore, and spots closer to larger populations like Waiheke, the Noises, Rakino and Kawau Islands, the far north and the Coromandel Peninsular are all targets for those accustomed to flicking out soft baits.
It can be exciting fishing, for you are using a slender but strong rod, ultra fine braid line of about seven kilos breaking strain, a shock tippet of 15 or 20kg monofilament and a spin reel. The reel is important and cheap models should be avoided as the drag will probably not do the job, for it is important to be able to stop a large snapper getting into the thick clumps of weed or sharp fangs of the surrounding rocks. The drag on the reel will be set strongly and the rod lifted high in the air to try and keep up the head of the hooked fish as it is literally dragged out into clear water.
Shore-based anglers can also target this type of fishing but will be using floating baits and berley to attract passing fish for, unlike those in a boat who will be idling slowly along casting to new water, they are stuck in one spot.
It is more about small numbers of quality fish rather than catching large numbers, but some surprisingly large specimens can be hooked.
For the rock angler casting floating baits of fresh mullet, jack mackerel, kahawai or pilchards will work. Berley will also increase the chances of success and a berley bag is easily employed and anchored with a rope around a sharp rock.
The land-based game fishermen who specialise in catching large kingfish also do well at this time of year, again not hooking large numbers of fish but concentrating on the occasional large specimen. They use berley to attract bait fish like kahawai and mackerel, then deploy the live bait under a balloon which is cast out.
Choosing the location is important, and as with all fishing local knowledge is invaluable. But if fishing a new area a visit at low tide will reveal details of the underwater topography. The elements to look for a channel and guts, weed beds and currents. A point protruding out from the shore will always hold more fish than a sheltered bay nearby.
The cold, unstable weather of mid-winter makes safety precautions even more important than in summer; with lifejackets, warm clothing and a hand-held VHF radio or cellphone in a waterproof cover standard equipment on a boat.
Rock fishermen should always watch the sea for the best fishing is where white water and currents stir the water, but the occasional rogue wave can catch an unwary person standing close to the edge. Warm clothing and boots do not make for great buoyancy so a life jacket makes good sense. Some will even use a light rope to anchor themselves to the rocks as an extra precaution. An awareness of the tide is also important, for the best time to fish for kingfish is at low tide but of course six hours later the water line will be two or three metres higher, and the high tide mark is usually clearly delineated by dark weed on the rocks. An escape route if cut off should also be identified in advance before fishing begins.

Fresh water
There has been some great fly fishing in the Hinemaiaia Stream, at Hatepe on Lake Taupo, where the spawning runs started in late April and really took off in the first three weeks of May. One angler reporting catching 10 trout in top condition ranging from 1.6kg to 2kg and lost several much bigger ones over a few days from the rip and in the stream up to the first main bend in the river. Since then the fishing has slowed.
The Tongariro River and the Tauranga-Taupo and Waitahanui Rivers are all fishing well this winter, and the rain this weekend will no doubt trigger more runs of trout from the lake. The fresh-run fish are always the best to catch, both in terms of their condition and their willingness to take a fly. While a tiny nymph representing a natural one cast upstream, often in conjunction with a small globug, is the preferred approach in low, clear water the traditional downstream wet fly works well when the water is discoloured after rain. The red setter, rabbit and woolly bugger patterns are popular with a short trace for this style of fishing.

Bite times
Bite times are 12.15pm today, and 12.50am and 1.20pm tomorrow.

Tip
When casting soft baits among rocks and white water the lure should be dropped as close to the edge as possible, then allowed to sink a little before retrieving with short jerks of the rod while winding in the slack line. As with bait fishing, keeping in touch with the lure is a critical part of the process. Fish will sometimes grab the lure while it is sinking so the line should be kept tight so a bite will be felt.
Baits can be allowed to sink slowly, but if left too long will snag among weed so should be moved slowly by lifting the rod and carefully taking up the slack with the reel. While fishing the rod should be kept low, pointing at the lure or bait, so it can be lifted when a bite is detected while reeling in line at the same time. For the strike, steady pressure is better than a sudden heave on the rod.
More fishing action can be found at www.GTTackle.co.nz.

Photo : Geoff Thomas
The white water around kelp is a prime target for casting lures and baits.
... See MoreSee Less

GT Fishing Report - 24 June 2017

Some huge snapper are being caught by casting soft baits into two metres of water around the rocky shoreline of Great Barrier Island. While this type of fishing is quite specialised, it can be adapted to any situation where current and white water are present. It is particularly effective around offshore islands like the Barrier, the Moko Hinau and the Mercury Islands.
But it will also work anywhere a point or peninsular protrudes from the shore, and spots closer to larger populations like Waiheke, the Noises, Rakino and Kawau Islands, the far north and the Coromandel Peninsular are all targets for those accustomed to flicking out soft baits.
It can be exciting fishing, for you are using a slender but strong rod, ultra fine braid line of about seven kilos breaking strain, a shock tippet of 15 or 20kg monofilament and a spin reel. The reel is important and cheap models should be avoided as the drag will probably not do the job, for it is important to be able to stop a large snapper getting into the thick clumps of weed or sharp fangs of the surrounding rocks. The drag on the reel will be set strongly and the rod lifted high in the air to try and keep up the head of the hooked fish as it is literally dragged out into clear water.
Shore-based anglers can also target this type of fishing but will be using floating baits and berley to attract passing fish for, unlike those in a boat who will be idling slowly along casting to new water, they are stuck in one spot.
It is more about small numbers of quality fish rather than catching large numbers, but some surprisingly large specimens can be hooked. 
For the rock angler casting floating baits of fresh mullet, jack mackerel, kahawai or pilchards will work. Berley will also increase the chances of success and a berley bag is easily employed and anchored with a rope around a sharp rock. 
The land-based game fishermen who specialise in catching large kingfish also do well at this time of year, again not hooking large numbers of fish but concentrating on the occasional large specimen. They use berley to attract bait fish like kahawai and mackerel, then deploy the live bait under a balloon which is cast out. 
Choosing the location is important, and as with all fishing local knowledge is invaluable. But if fishing a new area a visit at low tide will reveal details of the underwater topography. The elements to look for a channel and guts, weed beds and currents. A point protruding out from the shore will always hold more fish than a sheltered bay nearby.
The cold, unstable weather of mid-winter makes safety precautions even more important than in summer; with lifejackets, warm clothing and a hand-held VHF radio or cellphone in a waterproof cover standard equipment on a boat.
Rock fishermen should always watch the sea for the best fishing is where white water and currents stir the water, but the occasional rogue wave can catch an unwary person standing close to the edge. Warm clothing and boots do not make for great buoyancy so a life jacket makes good sense. Some will even use a light rope to anchor themselves to the rocks as an extra precaution. An awareness of the tide is also important, for the best time to fish for kingfish is at low tide but of course six hours later the water line will be two or three metres higher, and the high tide mark is usually clearly delineated by dark weed on the rocks. An escape route if cut off should also be identified in advance before fishing begins.

Fresh water
There has been some great fly fishing in the Hinemaiaia Stream, at Hatepe on Lake Taupo, where the spawning runs started in late April and really took off in the first three weeks of May. One angler reporting catching 10 trout in top condition ranging from 1.6kg to 2kg and lost several much bigger ones over a few days from the rip and in the stream up to the first main bend in the river. Since then the fishing has slowed.
The Tongariro River and the Tauranga-Taupo and Waitahanui Rivers are all fishing well this winter, and the rain this weekend will no doubt trigger more runs of trout from the lake. The fresh-run fish are always the best to catch, both in terms of their condition and their willingness to take a fly. While a tiny nymph representing a natural one cast upstream, often in conjunction with a small globug, is the preferred approach in low, clear water the traditional downstream wet fly works well when the water is discoloured after rain. The red setter, rabbit and woolly bugger patterns are popular with a short trace for this style of fishing.

Bite times
Bite times are 12.15pm today, and 12.50am and 1.20pm tomorrow.

Tip
When casting soft baits among rocks and white water the lure should be dropped as close to the edge as possible, then allowed to sink a little before retrieving with short jerks of the rod while winding in the slack line. As with bait fishing, keeping in touch with the lure is a critical part of the process. Fish will sometimes grab the lure while it is sinking so the line should be kept tight so a bite will be felt.
Baits can be allowed to sink slowly, but if left too long will snag among weed so should be moved slowly by lifting the rod and carefully taking up the slack with the reel. While fishing the rod should be kept low, pointing at the lure or bait, so it can be lifted when a bite is detected while reeling in line at the same time. For the strike, steady pressure is better than a sudden heave on the rod.
More fishing action can be found at www.GTTackle.co.nz.  

Photo : Geoff Thomas
The white water around kelp is a prime target for casting lures and baits.

Comment on Facebook

This is where the kayak is king

Ian Best. Give this a read bro

Michael Koekemoer Werner Botha winter mish mid-july to GB?

Travis Lord

Isn't there enough plastic in the oceans already. ..!!!

+ View previous comments

4 days ago

Catch Fishing

WTF 23 June 2017 ... See MoreSee Less

Comment on Facebook

Still think you should get your own fishing show guys ..

I'll take you to these places when you come over bro !!

Bait and burly

Shane Strout

Karl Evans

Aaron

Josh Uddenberg

Grant Wharton

Justin Worsley

Jack Blondel Lewis Blondel Matt Girard

Ryan Thwaites shallows it is boy

Need bigger tool box = need bigger boat = again!!!

Felix Fielding when are we gonna chase em

Daryn Jones

+ View previous comments

1 week ago

Catch Fishing

"Just wanting to thank you for my squid wings. Was really super stoked to receive this in the mail last week! How epic is this gear.. love your work. Thanks again! Shane"
Thanks for your feedback Shane, good luck over in Tasmania ticking the kingfish and snapper off your bucket list!
... See MoreSee Less

Just wanting to thank you for my squid wings. Was really super stoked to receive this in the mail last week! How epic is this gear.. love your work. Thanks again! Shane
Thanks for your feedback Shane, good luck over in Tasmania ticking the kingfish and snapper off your bucket list!

Comment on Facebook

Looks like Catch fishing are putting there products out everywhere. Thanks to KP MARINE I have many new lures to sample too.🖒

No .I would fish everyday if poss.glad it's not a one man band Addictive Tackle. 🖒

Am I the only person that enjoys Fishing this much ?

+ View previous comments

1 week ago

Catch Fishing

Exciting and celebration all around lol. My first Kingi on a Catch Fishing Long John Slider. What a fight it was but no match for my Dogfight lol. Long John Slider thank you very much haha ... See MoreSee Less

Comment on Facebook

Cheeeehooooo....nice one uce.

Awesome addition very informative I enjoy Tackle a lot

1 week ago

Catch Fishing

56cm Blue Moki for dinner 😉 - #baitless #stealthkayaksnz #wellington ... See MoreSee Less

Comment on Facebook

Valuable Post!!! I like it a bunch!

1 week ago

Catch Fishing

The Catch Fishing Jig Extreme Rod getting bent with Viking Maniyaks Bam Blakie. Kingfish, Blue cod and even a warehou making it to the boat. ... See MoreSee Less

The Catch Fishing Jig Extreme Rod getting bent with Viking Maniyaks Bam Blakie. Kingfish, Blue cod and even a warehou making it to the boat.

Comment on Facebook

Ripper Fish!

Good stuff bros

. Prompts many significant questions to me.